This page should be read with the women’s costume page as I have not duplicated info that is on that page including supplier’s details.

Jacob at Glastonbury without his chaperon

Jacob at Glastonbury

Jacob is wearing a linen coif and also a linen shirt. On his legs he wears linen braies which are 3/4 length pants tied at the waist with a drawstring. Over this he wears woollen leg hose. In the earlier periods these hose were split – made of two seperate legs and either looped onto a belt or tied to the braies.

This had a practical advantage as well as a fashionable one. Not only could you wear hose of different colurs as Andy is doing in the pic below but also if you got a hole in one leg you wouldn’t have to throw away the whole garment!

Andy in his colourful hose

Andy in his colourful hose

 You can see more clearly here how Andy’s hose are tied to his belt with cord and how he has the fetching baggy braies look so fashionable in the 1300s! Again belts are useful for attching bags, swords and the small shield (buckler) that Andy carries.

Andy is just wearing a sunhat in that pic but an alternative for colder days is a small woollen cap as in the pic of Fox below.

Fox in kit complete with apron

Fox in kit complete with apron

In this close up you can see the detail of the hat and the lovely period glasses that Fox is wearing!
Fox and his lovely smile!

Fox and his lovely smile!

Jacob with chaperon and bag

Jacob with chaperon and bag

In this above picture Jacob also wears a lined wool chaperon. This is hood covering the head and shoulders that has a long liripipe or tail at the back. In the later medieval period the chaperon evolved into a very elaborate hat known by the same name – for a discussion of this and pictures please see this link.

The chaperon is one of the few pieces of costume that I have bought – these come from the lovely Jacky of Cloaked and Daggered Costumes. She is a very talented lady who makes not ony wonderful chaperons and cloaks but all sorts of beautiful things.

If you do want to make your own a rough idea of a pattern is given at the Costumer’s Manifesto site.

For colder days a tunic or kirtle made of linen or wool can be worn. These pictures from the Reconstructing History web site show the different styles that were worn.

Image dated 1430 showing men's kirtles

Image dated 1430 showing men's kirtles

Image dated 1450 from Belgium

Image dated 1450 from Belgium